17 October

Data for Safety

On the 31st of March 2017, key actors from the aviation sector agreed to join in the Data4Safety (D4S) co-operative partnership initiated by EASA.
14 July

State of Bremen passes general rules for Federal drone law implementation

Since the new drone specific German air law entered into force on 7 April 2017, the drone community is awaiting the passing of the new common principles to be agreed between the Federal and the German States’ governments, to support the uniform implementation of the law in all German States. While the process is still ongoing, the State of Bremen now took the initiative and published its own general rules for implementation of the new Federal air law specific to drones.
18 May

Italy approves a new amendment to the national drone regulation

​On 24 March 2017, the Italian Civil Aviation Authority (ENAC) approved a new amendment to the 2015 unmanned aerial systems national regulation. The amendment modifies art. 29 of the regulation by introducing a new safety legal framework which clarifies ENAC’s competency in case of accidents.
12 May

Towards the adoption of harmonised rules

The European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) recently published a new proposal to regulate the use of small drones in Europe. All interested parties are welcome to comment the document from 12 May until 12 August 2017. The proposed regulatory framework is a new step towards the adoption of harmonised rules at European level.
08 May

Airspace safety: 7 measures that should be implemented for all types of drones

In September 2016, 16 European aviation associations signed a Joint Statement to call for the introduction of new regulatory measures in the national drone regulations adopted by the European Member States. These measures will help to produce a robust harmonized EU-wide regulatory safety framework for drones, which is pivotal for the preservation of a high level of safety in the European airspace.
07 March

Taking your drone on an airplane

Drones are powered by lithium-ion batteries, which represent a potential threat to the flight when carried on board. That is why carrying drone batteries on board of commercial aircraft is strictly regulated by law. Follow the safety recommendations of the European Cockpit Association (ECA), as well as the international regulations, to prevent any accidents. Do not hesitate to contact your airline for further information before purchasing your ticket.
28 February

Portugal adopts a new drone regulation

On 14t December 2016, Regulation No.1093/2016 was approved, providing a framework for the operation of drones in Portugal. The regulation applies to all civil drones, except those operating in closed or covered areas. To assist pilots, the Portuguese Civil Aviation Authority also launched a new website – voanaboa.pt​– to provide an overview of the rules established. The Regulation has entered into force on 13 January 2017.
20 February

Drone Guidelines in Germany for Professional Users

​The Deutsche Flugsicherung (DFS) – German Agency for Flight Safety issued in June 2016 new guidelines regarding the approval of operation for drones below 25 kg which are operated within visual line of sight and not exclusively for sports or recreational purposes. Since it is the responsibility of the Bundesländer (federal states) to implement these guidelines, procedures may vary in detail. However, these may accept an approval which was granted by another federal state or country.
06 February

Flying restrictions for recreational drones in France (new interactive map)

The French National Institute of Geographic and Forest Information (IGN), has recently published an interactive map displaying permanent no-fly zones and maximum altitudes. The purpose of this map is to help recreational users flying their drone safely and legally over the French territory. It can be read in parallel with the 2-pages safety notice prepared by the French authorities.
10 January

Drone legislation in Belgium

The Royal Decree of 10 April 2016 distinguishes three different types of activity depending on the purpose of the flight (recreational and non-recreational use) and the level of risks associated with the operation.